Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the UK: Part 2

The problem of racial and ethnic inequality is not just found in the economy and in personal finances. It is also found in other parts of society. This article will build on part 1 by highlighting some of the disparities found in broader social outcomes and experiences.

Stop and Search

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: GOV.UK

Link to Source: Click here

Note: The ethnic groups are those used by GOV.UK. As previously mentioned, a limitation of the groupings is that “Multiple Ethnic Group Background” is not split up, which may overlook some individuals’ experiences.

There are significant disparities in stop and search rates amongst different ethnic groups. The rate for people from a Black Caribbean background is more than 10X the rate for people from a White British background. The Equality and Human Rights Commission released a report (found here) in 2010 which focused on the problem of disproportionately high stop and search rates amongst minority ethnic groups. The report concluded that “the police use of the powers in England and Wales remains disproportionately weighted against Black and Asian people” and that this disproportionality was not justified.

Trust in the Police

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: GOV.UK

Link to Source: Click here

Notes: The White and Black African, and White Gypsy or Irish Traveller ethnic groups were withheld due to small sample sizes.

Given the discrepancies in stop and search rates, it is perhaps unsurprising that there are also significant discrepancies in confidence in the police between different ethnic groups.

Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: GOV.UK

Link to Source: Click here

The disparities in average health-related quality of life after the age of 65 between people of different ethnicities are less significant than in other areas. However, there is still inequality; notably, people from Bangladeshi, Pakistani, White Gypsy or Irish Traveller backgrounds tend to have significantly worse health outcomes than those from other ethnic groups. Furthermore, people from minority ethnic groups have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus pandemic. You can find more about the disproportionate effects of coronavirus here.

Children in Low-Income Households

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: GOV.UK

Link to Source: Click here

Note: The ethnic groups are those used by GOV.UK. As previously mentioned, a limitation of the groupings is that “Multiple Ethnic Group Background” is not split up, which may overlook some individuals’ experiences. Furthermore, the Black ethnic group aggregates the Black African, Black Caribbean, and Black other ethnic groups which may overlook some peoples’ experiences.

There are significant disparities between ethnic groups regarding the percentage of children living in low-income households. Children from a Pakistani background are most likely to be part of a low-income household, whilst children from an Indian background and children from a White British background are least likely to be part of a low-income household.

Conclusion

The articles in our racial and ethnic disparities series have highlighted that there are several key disparities between different ethnic groups in the UK. As mentioned in part 1, we have not highlighted all inequalities and there are some disparities that are more insidious that will not necessarily be directly observed, such as unconscious bias. Instead, unconscious bias and other forms of racism will contribute to the directly observed inequalities highlighted above. It is clear, from the data that has been presented, that the UK has a problem of racial and ethnic inequality with several gaps that must be closed. Hopefully, the government’s race and ethnic disparities report mentioned at the start of this series will go some way in informing how policymakers can address gaps by highlighting disparities, how these disparities are interrelated and what causes them. However, addressing inequality and racism in the UK, and therefore creating a more just society will require more than a report - it will require action.

Assumptions 2020 Team, 20th December 2020

stopsearch.png
Police.png
health2.png
childlowinc.png